Browsing all articles tagged with Roger Goodell
Oct
6

The UFC Needs a Minor League – Point/Counterpoint: Part 1

With the recent purchase by Zuffa, LLC (UFC’s corporate owner) of both the WEC and Strikeforce many are wondering what will become of those brands and their fighters. One option is to create a minor league system out of these two organizations. In two articles I am going to explore why the UFC should create a junior promotion and why it shouldn’t. In today’s article we’ll be exploring why they should. Next week, we’ll look at the counter-point.

Here is what I propose – Zuffa should keep the Strikeforce banner and turn it into a minor league with the same seven weight classes as the UFC. Strikeforce does not have men’s featherweight and bantamweight divisions currently, but there are plenty of fighters at those weights who fought in the WEC. The new Strikeforce should be a stepping stone into the big leagues. Young, unproven fighters will have place to prove themselves without being pushed in the deep end right away. Veterans on the downturn can be given a second chance to fight themselves back into contention and give the younger competitors valuable experience. Maybe winning a title and defending it once is an automatic promotion to the UFC. Or it could be as simple as a five fight winning streak. Here a few reasons why a minor league system is necessary.

There a too many talented fighters to simply make large cuts

While the UFC could use some new blood at the heavier weight classes some of the lighter ones are packed already. UFC.com lists 58 welterweight fighters and 54 lightweight contenders. There is no way that all of those challengers can be given a fair shake based on the UFC’s scheduling. Put some of the less-proven and over-the-hill fighters in Strikeforce and let them work their way up to the UFC.

The reasons for getting kicked out of the UFC are too varied and inconsistent

There are three main reasons a fighter will get the boot from the UFC -

1. The Fighter loses three straight fights.

2. Unsportsmanlike conduct.

3. Failed drug tests.

Those are all valid reasons, but UFC President Dana White seems to be the lone decider of who the rule applies to. For example, Dan Hardy has lost four straight fights but does not seem to be in danger of losing his UFC contract. Meanwhile other fighters are cut after just two straight losses.  Paul Daley was banned for life from the UFC for hitting the aforementioned Hardy after their fight had ended. Yet, British star Michael Bisping spit at his defeated opponent Jorge Rivera and was simply fined. He remains one of the UFC’s biggest starts and is even coaching the current season of The Ultimate Fighter. Top ten middleweights Chael Sonnen and Nate Marquardt failed drug tests in similar manners. Marquardt was cut unceremoniously while the UFC was willing to schedule Sonnen’s fight this Saturday in Texas because he couldn’t meet other state’s athletic requirements.

There are obviously other factors at work in the decision to cut someone. How exciting their fights are, how marketable they are, the level of competition they lost to, and their relationship with Dana White and the UFC are all big ones.  In my opinion, that’s putting too much faith in Dana White. Can you imagine if Roger Goodell had the power to cut players from NFL teams?  Instead of relying on subjective judgment the UFC should demote a fighter after three straight losses, an instance of unsportsmanlike conduct, or a failed drug test. The fighter would instantly be assigned to Strikeforce. It would be a clear demotion, but also give the fighter a path back to the UFC if they perform well and keep their act clean.

The Ultimate Fighter is failing

The Ultimate Fighters is the UFC TV reality program which rewards the winner with a fight contract. It started off strong but has not produced a meaningful contender since the fifth season. It turns out fighting a bunch of other inexperienced combatants does not prepare one for the level of competition in the UFC.  A number of former TUF winners have been released from the UFC.

How about instead of rewarding a TUF winner with competition they’re likely not ready for they are awarded a Strikeforce deal instead? They can fight other up-and-comers and UFC demotions and ease into the higher level of opposition.

There is already a TV deal in place for Strikeforce

I’m certainly not the first one to point this out: UFC Should Consider Extending Contract With Showtime, Keep Strikeforce Brand Alive. But, I agree with the argument, the TV deal is in place and Zuffa should use it to extend the Strikeforce brand. You will notice that article points out a number of similar advantages to those previously mentioned.

The UFC is simply getting too large to be contained in one fight promotion. A Triple-A organization solves a myriad of upcoming issues for Zuffa. Next week we’ll be looking at the problems it may cause.

Mar
25

Episode 47.5 – The NFL Lockout and Redskins Draft Discussion

Jake makes his podcast debut! Mark and Jake discuss the NFL Labor Dispute and Redskins draft. Please excuse the lower sound quality we had a bad Skype connection. Make sure to subscribe and rate us on iTunes! Or subscribe to our podcast feed! If you enjoy our show please tell your friends!

Topics

  • NFL Owners and NFLPA let the CBA expire, NFL under lockout, hearing scheduled for April 6
  • Are the Owners or the Players in the wrong here?
  • New NFL rule changes include instant replay and kickoffs
  • Who will the Skins draft at 10th overall?
  • What are the Skins biggest draft needs?
  • Can the Skins successfully transition to a 3-4 this offseaon?
May
21

In case you haven't noticed… Michael Vick is out

Big Story this week: Vick released from prison.

Apparently this is a pretty heated issue: Should Vick be able to play in the NFL again?

I’m going to come right out and say it right off the bat: Vick served his time, now let him play.  It’s that simple to me.  He’s served time in jail, lost his job and lost millions upon millions of dollars from the Falcons as well as endorsement deals.

However, the questions still persists and it almost seems as though the real focus is whether Vick deserves to play.

A surprising amount of writers believe  he does not.  Dogfighting is so heinous (yes, I really wanted to use that word) that he should never be allowed to step on a football field again.

from TSN Mike Florio writes:

Vick intentionally, deliberately, and soberly embarked on a hobby that violated multiple federal and state laws, and that was premised on the cold-blooded torture and killing of dogs.

And then he lied about his conduct, to anyone who wanted to know the truth. He even tried to deceive about the killing of underperforming dogs after pleading guilty, and while strapped to a polygraph.

If it were up to us, Vick wouldn’t play for the Bears or any other NFL team. Ever.

Also from TSN, Spencer Hall “Mike Vick has a disease and there is no cure.”

The point is not to dismiss this possibility, but to remember that the actor in question suffers from an incurable condition for which there is no cure: stupidity. It may flare up at any point without warning, and its side effects are endless. Take your chances with him at your own risk.

Okay, so:  1. He had a dogfighting ring that was cruel and 2. that was stupid.  That pretty much sums it up.  Oh wait, no we need to make sure he’s paid his debt to society.  The Humane Society wants to help out, which is nice for Vick because that certainly would help his public image.  Vick apparently sat down with the Humane Society recently and told them of his growing up with pit bull fighting and how he never questioned it as a child.  What I like about the Humane Society’s approach is this statement: “For me, it’s not about Michael Vick and providing endless punitive treatment. It’s about stopping other young people from going down the road Vick took.”

But here’s what I don’t like: “He needs to prove himself to us and the rest of the country.”

Really?  What kind of price to society should dogfighting bring?  I mean Goodell and the NFL has given wife-beaters, drunk drivers, pot-smokers and crack heads second chances?  But not Vick?  People couldn’t possibly believe that dog-fighting is worse than say, killing someone while driving drunk or could they?  Well Florio of TSN thinks that because the actions after you are drunk driving are unintentional it is less reprehensible.  He calls it a question of intent.  He’s right, Vick was sober when he had dogs killed and someone like Stallworth was not when he hit and killed someone.  But I think we should also take into account the loss or is that not post-modern enough?  Dogs being killed is sad and wrong, but people being hurt and killed is tragic.

Okay, enough of what the bloggers and writers think!  How about the pro’s?

  • Arthur Blank, Falcons owner (though set at quarterback) believes that Vick has paid his debt to society.
  • Sam Huff quoting Clark Gable, “frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn.”
  • Tony Dungy: Believes Vick should get a second chance in life, is happy that he’ll be living differently. (I think Dungy wants him to be able to play again, honestly.)
  • Lovie Smith:”Mike made a mistake, and he’s paying the price for that mistake. Once you’ve paid your debt to society, you have to say, ‘OK, let’s go on from there.” Oh yeah, he also said Vick was like Martha Stewart ha.

Okay, what do YOU think?  Should Michael Vick be allowed back in the league, should he do more to “pay” society, do you even care?

And no, we will not even entertain Vick to the Redskins to replace Campbell nonsense